Half Fisherman's Rib Stitch Pattern


How to Knit: Half Fisherman's Rib Stitch | Easy Knitting Tutorial & Pattern for Ribbing


The half Fisherman's rib stitch creates a chunky ribbed texture with bulky rib on one side and more compact rib on the other. I will walk you slowly through the process in this video.


This stitch is produced from a 2-row repeat pattern, and I have also substituted slip stitches into the pattern at the beginning of each row - to add neater slip stitch edges to the knitting. This is entirely optional though.


First you will need to cast on an odd number of stitches.

For a pattern without slip stitch edges you repeat:

Row 1 (and all odd-numbered rows): k

Row 2 (and all even-numbered rows): *p1, k1b

Repeat from * until last stitch, then p1 (Where k1b = a 'knit 1 below' stitch)


And for a pattern with slip stitch edges you repeat:

Row 1 (and all odd-numbered rows): slip a stitch knitwise, k to the end of the row

Row 2 (and all even-numbered rows): slip a stitch purlwise, k1b *p1, k1b

Repeat from * until last stitch, then p1


To bind off, I would finish on a knit row and bind off as normal. Thanks for watching!

If you don't know the difference between circular and flat knitting, I'll just give a little overview first - but I'll also be doing a more in-depth lesson soon.



Even though circular knitting needles are used in both of these examples, only the knitting on the right is circular knitting, whilst the knitting on the left is flat knitting. You can tell because the circular knitting always forms a circle or tube, so there is no separation between the ends of the rows.



Examples of a flat knitting chart (on the left) and a circular knitting chart (on the right):


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