How to Knit Yarn Overs


'Yarn overs' are a common single increase technique; meaning that they are used to increase the number of stitches on your knitting needles by 1.

The special thing about yarn overs, though, is that they also make a hole in your knitting. And that is what sets them apart from other increases.


So why would you want a hole in your knitting? Well, yarn overs are a vital technique in lace knitting, where holes are arranged in patterns to produce a delicate-looking knitted fabric.


I have to say that I particularly like yarn overs, just because they're so easy to do!

As a beginner, you may find them confusing at first, due to the fact that there are 4 different ways of producing a yarn over; the method you use depends on what kind of stitch is before and after the yarn over.


For instance, the yarn over between 2 knit stitches would be done differently to a yarn over between 2 purl stitches.


Take a look at my video tutorial to find out more:


Top tip: You only ever wrap the yarn anti-clockwise around the right hand needle.


So, here are the 4 slightly different yarn over methods:

- Yarn over between 2 knit stitches; Bring the working yarn from behind the needles, between the needles to the front.

- Yarn over between 2 purl stitches; Take the working yarn anti-clockwise around the right hand needle to the back, and then between the needles to the front.

- Yarn over between a knit stitch & a purl stitch; Wrap the working yarn anti-clockwise around the right hand needle 1.5 times - so take it from the back of the needles, through the needles to the front, and then wrap the yarn fully (anticlockwise) around the right hand needle to bring it back to the front.

- Yarn over between a purl stitch & a knit stitch; Don't move the working yarn at all...simple!



In the video, I also demonstrate how to deal with yarn overs on the next row;

Normally, you will just treat the yarn over as you would a normal stitch...but if you made the yarn over accidentally, you can remove the yarn over by simply dropping it from the needle.


Yarn overs are usually paired up with a decrease (a k2tog is commonly chosen) on the same row so that the overall number of stitches remains unchanged.


I hope this has been useful for you :)


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